Camp Ipad Photography: Lines, Shapes, Shadows

Lines, Shapes and Shadows. You don’t have to do all three in one day, especially if it isn’t sunny. This summer I did lines and shapes first, then shadows another day.

With little kids you can show images and ask what shape they see, to get them practicing their shapes. You can also introduce horizontal versus vertical lines as well. This is great to do in a classroom too, especially PK-K since there are so many toys and things in there.

I do encourage my students to play with editing, trying the different preset filters on the iPad. With the older students you can show them how to access the editing buttons and explain what saturation, contrast and what it means to adjust the shadows and highlights separately. In the past, with cameras, I switched them all to black and white mode and we photographed in that mode all year.

Patterned Mittens

img_5352I did this with 1st grade. After doing line and shapes, we did patterns. Students spent a lot of time practicing drawing and coloring patterns on white paper. We discussed why we make patterns, specifically looking to our clothing. Using what we already knew about lines and shapes we created patters to prepare for a winter mitten design. I gave them a mitten stencil on colored construction paper, and they chose what color they wanted. I find that using colored paper is more forgiving when they don’t color in all the way it makes a nice background base. They took their practice pattern paper and transferred their designs to the mitten, using at leave 4 patterns. We used crayons and/or colored pencils. Some students outlines their patterns with sharpie.

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The snowflakes were really fun to do! I read Snowflake Bentley to the children and showed his real snowflake photography. They were fascinated by the designs. We reviewed symmetry here and brought up radial symmetry. We discussed what other things have radial symmetry as well. I also follow a friend on Facebook who photographs snowflakes today to show the kids a contemporary artist. She goes by The Snowflake Photographer and her work is breathtaking. We did some practice snowflakes using our drawing from observations skills. The kids were surprisingly into making the snowflakes look as close to the photographs as possible. I gave them black paper and white colored pencils for final snowflakes, then we attached the mitten to it. In the future I’d like to have them cut out a snowflake as well and glue on onto the mitten as if it was catching one.

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