Valentine Jim Dine

Fun and quick Valentine’s Day project I did with PK. I showed the work. By Jim Dine and we talked about how they thought he made his paintings. I love them because they are messy but controlled. 

I told the little ones to use a stamping methods with the brush. We used Paint Cakes, my favorite. They were familiar with the paint cakes and how to use them properly. I told them to work with one color at a time. Wet the brush, load up the brush with paint, and gently go up and down, up and down stamping color onto their hearts. Once the paint rain out, wash your brush and pick a new color. 

As they finished at different times I had another table set up with colored paper and crayons. They washed up and picked a color and scribble scrabbled all over the paper with different colored crayons. 

I quickly glued the hearts to the backgrounds and they were able to take their Valentines home that day! 

Secondary Colored Sunsets

fullsizerender1I did this project with PK to teach them how to mix primary colors into secondary colors. Each day they’d make a new color. We started on the carpet and I’d find someone wearing the color of the day (green, orange, purple). Make a big deal abut that color! Today we are painting with green (or orange or purple) but oops! I ran out of green paint! What do I do?! Amazingly some PK students will tell you to mix blue and yellow together, if not show them a magic trick! Put yellow all over the page, making sure to use a lot of paint to keep it nice and juicy. Now I will make magic, adding only a little but of blue and spreading it around. The kids will be very excited to see the magic happen. Talk about all the things that are green (orange, purple) and make a list. You can also add texture to the green paper by using scratch brushes or a pencil point and talk about texture. This will give them something to do when they’re done making the color.

Each child receives a new paper that I previously had written their names on the back and taped to either a covered table or whatever you use to keep the table clean because this will get messy. Taping the paper down really helps because then the kids don’t have to touch the paper.

Give them cups of yellow paint and tell them to cover the whole paper yellow. remind them to keep the paint nice and juicy because if it dries you can’t make magic. Walk around the room and as you see the papers turn yellow hand out the blue cups. Remind them to only dip the tip of the brush into the blue so the magic will work. Blue is a strong color so you only need a little.

As the papers turn you can hand out some tools for scratching and they love to do this. By the third color the kids get the process and do it on their own. I recommend big fat brushes for the kids who don’t have the grip yet.

I keep a table set up with the color of the day crayons and paper so that as they finish and clean their hands they can go there and continue to color in the color of the day. This will give you time to get the paintings on the drying rack.

Before you let them leave show two versions of the color. So if you’re doing green show a green that is more yellow and one that is more blue. Ask what the differences are and let them tell you. Ask why they think they are different. They can see how to achieve a darker blue green by adding more blue, or a lighter yellow green by adding less blue and talk about what you’d use these colors for!

Last day, assembling the sunsets. Purple is for the background, orange for the sun, green for the grass. Show them how it is done on the carpet first. I make a half circle on the back of all the oranges for them to cut and follow the line. The rays can be done 2 different ways. Kids can cut them or rip them, depending on their ability with scissors. Show them to add glue to the back of their pieces first, then glue it down on the purple paper. Show them how to cut the grass, by ripping or cutting a strip and ripping or cutting halfway along the strip. Glue it all together and done!

Fall Trees

img_3588We forget how young PreK is and how little they can do. Ripping paper is good for strengthening their hands.

We started out by talking about what’s going on with the trees outside. They should be able to discuss how the trees are changing and how winter is coming.

We look at pictures of trees and discuss what shapes we see. The trunk is a long skinny rectangle, and branches are smaller rectangles or just lines. We use brown to do this. Remind them not to add leaves yet because we’ll be gluing them on later. Once the tree is done talk about the ground line and make that in green for grass.

That can take one period, so next time they can do the leaves. Show them how to rip the paper about the size of the top of their little fingers. Doesn’t really matter as long as the peices aren’t too big or small. Talk about where the leaves would go, some on the branches, falling down or already on the ground in a pile.

Depending on ability some students will need help with the glue. I used glue sticks for this. Show them how to put glue on the paper then stick the leaf on. For some kids you can just cover a whole area with glue n let them go sticking.

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